Ukraine + 2 more

Ukraine: Humanitarian Impact Situation Report (As of 3:00 p.m. (EET), 11 March 2022)

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Situation Report
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This report is produced by OCHA Ukraine in collaboration with humanitarian partners.
It covers the period from 3 p.m. (EET) 10 March to 3 p.m. (EET) 11 March.

KEY FIGURES (FLASH APPEAL 2022)

12M people in need (Source: 2022 Flash Appeal)

6M people targeted (Source: 2022 Flash Appeal)

$1.1B funding required (US$) (Source: 2022 Flash Appeal)

11% funded (Source: FTS)

HIGHLIGHTS

• The geographic scope of the conflict continues to expand, with dire humanitarian consequences. On 10 March, air strikes and explosions were reported in Ivano-Frankivsk (Ivano-Frankivska oblast, west), Lutsk (Volynska oblast, north-west) and Novokodatskyi District of Dnipro (Dnipropetrovska oblast, central and eastern Ukraine), while new clashes are reported in settlements around Brovary, east of Kyiv, and Vyshhorod, north of the capital.

• In Government-controlled areas (GCA) of Luhanska oblast, as of 8 a.m. on 11 March, nearly 114,500 users across nearly 40 settlements have lost electricity, leaving nearly 2,220 users in Novotoshkivka, Nyzhne and Nyzhne-1 without access to the water supply.

• Donetska oblast authorities (GCA) report more than 400 infrastructure damage incidents over the last two weeks. The Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) Cluster estimates that around 2.2 million people on both sides of the “contact line” in Donetska oblast (east) receive a limited supply of water by schedule, while 650,000 people have no access at all.

• In Mariupol (Donetska oblast), the status of the repeatedly delayed safe passage corridor still remains unclear. There are reports of looting and violent confrontations among civilians over what little basic supplies remain in the city.
Medicines for life-threatening illnesses are quickly running out, hospitals are only partially functioning, and the food and water are in short supply.

• Every day, more and more people are being evacuated and receiving the urgent humanitarian assistance they desperately need, as Member States, UN agencies and humanitarian partners scale up response activities. As reported by the Government of Ukraine, more than 100,000 people have been evacuated in recent days. Meanwhile, the Russian Federation reported it has so far evacuated around 221,000 people from Ukraine towards Russia.

• On 11 March, more than 50 tons of humanitarian assistance was delivered to conflict-affected people in Enerhodar (Zaporizka oblast). Moreover, the Government of Switzerland has sent more than 500 tons of relief supplies to Moldova,
Poland and Ukraine, with at least 73 tons sent directly to the western part and capital area of Ukraine to date.

SITUATION OVERVIEW

Civilian casualties and displacement continue to increase significantly as the conflict intensifies. Since 24 February, around 4.4 million people have been forcibly displaced in Ukraine, including 2.5 million refugees who have fled to other countries, as reported by the UN High Commissioner for Refugees, and an estimated 1.9 million people internally displaced, according to the Ukraine Protection Cluster. As a growing number of displaced people head west, response capacities are being overwhelmed in Zakarpatska and Lvivska oblasts, among other western oblasts. which now host around 887,500 internally displaced persons (IDPs) – nearly a quarter of the combined population of these oblasts.

Between 4 a.m. on 24 February and midnight on 10 March, Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) reports at least 1,546 civilian casualties, including 564 killed. OHCHR also reports 622 casualties in Donetska and Luhanska oblasts (103 killed and 378 injured in GCA, and 25 killed and 116 injured in non-Governmentcontrolled areas, NGCA) and 924 civilian casualties in other regions of Ukraine. The actual number of civilian casualties across Ukraine is likely much higher, as many reports are still pending corroboration.

Ongoing hostilities in eastern Ukraine have triggered large-scale disruptions in basic services. In Luhanska oblast (GCA), as of 8 a.m. on 11 March, nearly 114,500 users across 38 settlements have lost electricity, leaving nearly 2,220 in Novotoshkivka, Nyzhne and Nyzhne-1 without access to the water supply. In neighbouring Donetska oblast, around 2.2 million people on both sides of the “contact line” receive a limited supply of water by schedule, while 650,000 people have no access at all, according to the WASH cluster.

Donetska oblast authorities (GCA) report more than 400 infrastructure damage incidents over the last two weeks, including at least 34 electricity facilities, 16 gas supply systems, nine health care and eight water facilities, two schools and 13 bridges. Meanwhile, in Kharkiv (north-east) – home to around 1.4 million people prior to the recent escalation in hostilities – intense clashes have damaged a gas pipeline, leaving some 30 per cent of residents without gas while temperatures dipped to - 20°C overnight.

Another day has brought fresh fighting in new localities in Kyivska oblast on the outskirts of the Ukrainian capital. Oblast authorities report heavy fighting in settlements around Brovary east of Kyiv and Vyshhorod north of the capital along the Dnieper River. Active hostilities continue in Bucha, Irpin, Hostomel and Makariv, with the main highway heading west toward Zhytomyr (Zhytomyrska oblast, north-west) becoming increasingly more dangerous for thousands still attempting to flee the conflict.

Since 24 February, the geographic scope of the conflict has expanded and continues to do so, with dire humanitarian consequences. On 10 March, explosions were reported near the airport in Ivano-Frankivsk. In Lutsk – about 260 km north of Ivano-Frankivsk – multiple explosions have reportedly killed at least one person at a local airfield, while air strikes near a pre-school and residential apartment building in Novokodatskyy District of Dnipro (Dnipropetrovska oblast) reportedly killed at least one person, according to UN reports.

On 11 March, evacuation routes were announced for four oblasts,2 with new safe passage corridors reportedly being negotiated for Chernihivska (north), Kharkivska (east) and Khersonska oblasts (south) at the time of writing. The Government of Ukraine says more than 100,000 people have been evacuated in recent days, with critical humanitarian relief supplies, like food and medicine, entering localities where safe passages have been negotiated and adhered to by sides. Meanwhile, the Russian Federation reported it has so far evacuated around 221,000 people from Ukraine towards Russia.

In Mariupol, the status of the repeatedly delayed safe passage corridor still remains unclear as the humanitarian situation becomes increasingly more dire with each passing hour. There have been reports of looting and violent confrontations among civilians over what little basic supplies remain in the city. Medicines for life-threatening illnesses are quickly running out, while hospitals are only partially functioning thanks to fuel deliveries from municipal authorities. The food and water supplies in the city are critically low, with relentless fighting preventing civilians from moving out and much-needed relief supplies from coming into the city. The Ukrainian Red Cross provided humanitarian relief supplies to affected people, including food, clothing and hygiene products.

Every day, more and more people are being evacuated and receiving the urgent humanitarian assistance they desperately need, as Member States, UN agencies and humanitarian partners scale up response activities. On 11 March, according to oblast authorities, more than 50 tons of humanitarian assistance reached conflict-affected people in Enerhodar (Zaporizka oblast, south-east) after safe passage for convoys was successfully negotiated, reinforcing the urgent need for more temporary pauses in fighting to be agreed on and respected by both sides of the conflict.

Moreover, the Government of Switzerland has sent more than 500 tons of relief supplies to Moldova, Poland and Ukraine, with at least 73 tons of assistance, including medical supplies, medicines and shelter equipment, sent directly to the western part and capital area of Ukraine. The Russian Federation reported that it delivered more than 1,670 tons of cargo with first aid kits, essential goods, medicines and food to Chernihiv (north), Donetsk, Luhansk (east), Kyiv, Kharkiv (north-east), Kherson (south) and Zaporizhzhia (south-east) since the start of the military offensive in Ukraine. This includes a reported delivery of around 250 tons of assistance to Donetsk, Luhansk and Chernihiv on 10 March. The UN does not inspect these shipments and, therefore, has no means of verifying their contents.

UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
To learn more about OCHA's activities, please visit https://www.unocha.org/.